Meeting Room Layout Hints & Tips

So you've found the perfect venue, taken care of the food and all those dietary requirements, booked your guest speakers and are just about ready. But, have you given consideration to your room layout? This is really one of the most important aspects of your event and should be considered before any other requirements. So here's our handy guide to room layouts with pro's and con's for each option.

Theatre Style

In this simple set up delegates are seated in rows facing a staging set up. This is the most efficient set-up when the attendees will act as an audience. Commonly used for conferences with large audiences for events that last less than half a day. 

Good for large groups when reading/writing is not required.

Flexible set-up, can be curved, circular, straight or angled toward the focal point. 

 

U-Shape

As the name suggests, this is a series of conference tables set in the shape of the letter U, with chairs around the outer edge. Often used for board meetings, directors meetings, etc. The presenter can position themselves at the opening of the U, as can any AV that may be being used such as a flat monitor, projector / screen.

Ideal for up to 30 people.

Classroom

 Rows of conference tables with chairsfacing ghe front of the room (and usually a speaker) providing writing space for each person. 

Perfect for small groups/lectures where all participants need to see the presenter. 

Boardroom Shape

A rectangular or oval table set up with chairs around all sides and ends. Used for Board of Director meetings, and more formal meetings. It promotes a good working atmosphere and interaction between participants. 

Banquet Style

Circular tables or banqueting tables with seats around the edges, usually to seat 8 or 10. This form of seating is used for weddings, gala dinners, and awards ceremonies. Tables can vary in size, with 5ft rounds to seat 8 or 6ft rounds that can seat up to 10. 

Cabaret

Similar to Banquet but with chairs half way around, facing the front of the room or staging area. This is commonly used for large groups of people but does reduce the available floor space.

 

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